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Susann Schmeisser

Die Krise der Sorgearbeit überwinden (ein Gespräch mit Frigga Haug und Julia Fritzsche) 724 1024 Susann Schmeisser

Die Krise der Sorgearbeit überwinden (ein Gespräch mit Frigga Haug und Julia Fritzsche)

Über Sozialismus reden #2

Für einen kurzen Augenblick konnte es so scheinen, als habe die Corona-Pandemie endlich das breite gesellschaftliche Bewusstsein dafür geschaffen, wie wichtig Pflege und Sorge für uns alle sind. Zu wichtig, um genau zu sein, um sie weiter unter so schlechten Bedingungen wie gegenwärtig zu organisieren. Das Home-Schooling im Home-Office, der Pflegenotstand in Krankenhäusern und Altenheimen schienen endlich die nötige Aufmerksamkeit für die Belastungen und prekären Bedingungen alltäglicher Sorge zu erzeugen. Eine Tarifrunde und einen Kinderbonus später stellt sich Ernüchterung ein. Wir wollen deshalb mit Frigga Haug und Julia Fritzsche diskutieren. Beide sagen seit langem, dass mehr Pflegekräfte und eine höhere Bezahlung allein, die Krise der Sorgearbeit nicht überwinden werden. Gebraucht werde vielmehr ein neues Verständnis menschlicher Tätigkeit und gesellschaftlicher Arbeitsteilung. Aber wie soll sie konkret aussehen, die Sorge und Pflege in einer Gesellschaft, in der sie weder zur unbezahlten Domäne von Frauen privatisiert noch professionalisiert, aber dafür den Gesetzen der Ökonomisierung unterworfen werden?

Frigga Haug hat als marxistische Feministin den besonderen zeitlichen Charakter von Sorgearbeit herausgearbeitet und mit dem Vier-in-Einem-Konzept schon 2011 einen radikalen Vorschlag für ein neues Verständnis von Arbeit gemacht, in dem Sorge, Kultur und Politik auch einen Platz haben.

Julia Fritzsche plädiert in Tiefrot und radikal bunt (Nautilus 2019) für eine neue linke Erzählung, die den Wunsch nach anderen menschlichen Beziehungsweisen auch auf dem Gebiet der Sorgearbeit artikuliert und wirkmächtig werden lässt.

#DemocratizingWork (with Neera Chandhoke, Isabelle Ferreras, Lisa Herzog) 724 1024 Susann Schmeisser

#DemocratizingWork (with Neera Chandhoke, Isabelle Ferreras, Lisa Herzog)

#DemocratizingWork

“Working humans are so much more than ‚resources‘. This is one of the central lessons of the current crisis.“ The worldwide political call of several thousand scientists who are taking the corona pandemic as an occasion to demand changes in the world of work begins with these words. The initiators argue for a „democratization“, „decommodification“ and „remediation“ of work by: 1. giving work councils the same voting rights as supervisory boards, 2. distributing and organizing work not exclusively as a commodity and via market mechanisms, but by creating a job guarantee, and 3. implementing these goals in line with a „Green Deal“ that takes into account the current ecological challenges. Depending on the understanding of democracy that underpins these demands and what exactly is meant by decommodification, the transformation of the world of work is less or more profound. As part of our series of events “In Context” we will discuss the arguments behind these demands with three of the main initiators of this call – Neera Chandhoke, Isabelle Ferreras and Lisa Herzog.

The list of problems and contradictions that the corona pandemic has made visible in the current world of work is long. First of all, the pandemic has shown that it is difficult to speak of a world of work at all. On the one hand, there is the relatively protected world of highly qualified employment, which largely corresponds to the normative standards of modern working societies. On the other hand, there is the world of underpaid, precarious work, which runs counter to these standards. The boundaries of these different worlds are largely determined by the political and social inequalities that run along the lines of class, race and gender. In the pandemic, it is precisely the underpaid and precarious fields of activity that have proven to be „systemically relevant“. Furthermore, the pandemic has made visible how strongly western industrial nations are dependent on workers and products from countries whose citizens are simultaneously denied legal migration and access to national labor rights. How far must the transformation of labor relations and their institutions go to enable a more just distribution and organization of work? Do we simply need more effective political means to enforce the normative standards already recognized? Or should we question the understanding of work that shapes our normative standards and labor institutions?

 

Neera Chandhoke is National Fellow at the Indian Council of Social Science Research and was formerly Professor of Political Science at the University of Delhi. In her last book Rethinking Pluralism, Secularism and Tolerance. Anxieties of Coexistence (2019) Chandhoke examines how people of different languages, religions and ethics live together with a degree of civility, dignity and mutual respect.

Isabelle Ferreras is a sociologist and political scientist and Professor at the University of Louvain (Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium). In her book Firms as Political Entities. Saving Democracy through Economic Bicameralism (2017) Ferreras suggests to organize firms in a “bicameral” structure that grants the same rights to workers as the ones held by capital investors.

Lisa Herzog is Associate Professor at the Faculty of Philosophy and the Center for Philosophy, Politics and Economics of the University of Groningen. In her book Die Rettung der Arbeit. Ein politischer Aufruf (2019) Herzog argues for a political shaping of the present and future world of work that sees work as an essential source of social integration.

Sabine Flick 1024 683 Susann Schmeisser

Sabine Flick

Fellow, Berlin Center

April – September 2020

E-Mail: s.flick@em.uni-frankfurt.de

Sabine Flick

Sabine Flick is researcher at the Insitute for Social Reserach at the Goethe University in Frankfurt am Main. Her research assumes an interdisciplinary outlook, crossing over the fields of social theory and critical theory, medical sociology, the sociology of the professions and questions of normativity and critique in empirical research. 2020 she completed her habilitation on the topic “On the Biographization of Social Suffering – Psychotherapeutic Practice in the Working Society”. Her work has been published in international journals such as Social Science and Medicine,  Distinktion. Journal of Social Theory or the European Journal for Social Theory.

During her stay in Berlin she worked on social suffering as psychic crises and the increasing dethematization of the social in mental health institutions and professions.  Her interest focuses on how a Critical Theory of Social Suffering can be accompanied with adequate empirical sociological research methods. While in Berlin and during the start of the COVID-19 Pandemic she prepared an empirical research project reflecting on the economic crisis associated with the COVID-19 pandemic that will likely increase the depth and breadth of precarious and highly demanding work. Here is a preprint of this work on „Work-related suffering as Social Suffering“. She also wrote a paper during her stay at the Center on the „Biographization of Social Suffering“ which is published with the Journal „Westend. Neue Zeitschrift für Sozialforschung“ in Fall 2020.

Allison Weir 1024 682 Susann Schmeisser

Allison Weir

Fellow, Berlin Center

June 2019

Allison Weir

Allison Weir is a Canadian social and political philosopher. She co-founded the Institute for Social Justice in Sydney, Australia, where she was Research Professor and Director of the Doctoral Program in Social Political Thought until the Institute closed in 2018. Before moving to Australia she held a tenured professorship in Philosophy and in Women and Gender Studies at Wilfrid Laurier University in Canada. She returned to Canada in 2019, and is a Visiting Scholar at the Centre for Ethics at the University of Toronto.
Her book, Decolonizing Freedom, will be published by Oxford University Press in 2021. She is the author of Identities and Freedom (Oxford) and Sacrificial Logics (Routledge).

Nikolas Kompridis 1024 683 Susann Schmeisser

Nikolas Kompridis

Fellow, Berlin Center

June 2019

Nikolas Kompridis

Nikolas Kompridis is Research Professor in Philosophy and Political Thought and Foundation Director of the Institute for Social Justice at the Australian Catholic University. He is the author of The Aesthetic Turn (Bloomsbury, 2014), Critique and Disclosure (MIT Press, 2006), and Philosophical Romanticism (Routledge, 2006). He is currently completing a book on Aesthetics and Political Theory, which will be published by Polity Press, and another book, Critique and Receptivity, which is currently under review. Two other book projects involve an edited volume on Transforming the Anthropocene, and a volume of his writings on romanticism. Kompridis has published widely in journals and edited volumes on a wide and diverse set of topic.
His areas of specialisation are 19th and 20th century European Philosophy; Critical Theory, aesthetics and political philosophy. He optained his Ph.D. in 1992 at the interdisciplinary programme in Social and Political Thought at York University, Toronto.

Jonathan David Klein 1024 683 Susann Schmeisser

Jonathan David Klein

Fellow, Berlin Center

April 2020 – June 2021

Email: jonathan.david.klein@hu-berlin.de

Jonathan David Klein

Jonathan Klein is a Fellow at the Center in Berlin. He studied European Studies, International Politics and Political Theory in Maastricht, Tokyo, New York and Frankfurt am Main and subsequently worked as a research assistant at the Cluster of Excellence “The Formation of Normative Orders”. He is currently writing his doctoral thesis in Frankfurt am Main (under the supervision of Prof. Dr. Martin Saar) on the systematization and reconsideration of the concept of societal alienation in social theory.

According to his interpretation, the concept of societal alienation refers to a specific constitution of social relations, in which these relations become an alien power, relatively independent of the will of the actors, who nevertheless produce them. His work seeks to demonstrate that the concept of alienation is indispensable for understanding the social-theoretical specificity of the social interdependence constituted by the system of commodity production.

Grasping the constitution of this social connection with its contradictory dynamics is the basis for arriving at a more profound understanding of the economic and political crises of our time. Furthermore, such a perspective is oriented towards an immanent critique of the capitalist economy, holding the promise for developing more realistic perspectives of transformation.

Jean Louise Cohen 1024 683 Susann Schmeisser

Jean Louise Cohen

Senior Fellow, Berlin Center

June – July 2019

Email: jlc5@columbia.edu

Jean Louise Cohen

Jean Louise Cohen is the Nell and Herbert Singer Professor of Political Thought at Columbia University, New York. She is specialized in contemporary political and legal theory with particular research interests in democratic theory, critical theory, Civil society, gender and the law. Her influential contributions span from a critique of the missing political philosophy in Marx to a reactualization of Habermas‘ theory of society as the basis of contemporaray democratic theory.

In her current research project, Jean Cohen criticizes the appeal to a populist base as regressive even when issued within the context of left-wing populist radical democracy. The fallacy of populism is that it equates a homogenized idea of „the people“ with the democratic social body. Modern representative democracies, however, depend on a differentiated civil society which allows for the articulation of diverse and opposing interests and institutionalizes the mediation between those interests, as well as the more formal democratic decision-making processes.

Andrew Arato 1024 682 Susann Schmeisser

Andrew Arato

Senior Fellow, Berlin Center

June – July 2019

Email: arato@newschool.edu

Andrew Arato

Andrew Arato is a Professor of Political and Social Theory in the Department of Sociology at The New School for Social Research, New York. He is a member of the famous Hungarian School of Marxism in his early intellectual formation and is widely recognised for his influential book Civil Society and Political Theory, coauthored with Jean L. Cohen. He is also known for his work on critical theory, constitutions, and was from 1994 to 2014 co-editor of the journal Constellations with Nancy Fraser.

During his stay at the Humanities and Social Change Center he worked on a study of the authoritarian impulse discernible in right-wing populism as based on a phantasized reduction of the complexity of civil society to the unity of a homogenous people. To understand the role of religious extremism in this context, it is crucial to de-link it from traditional and particular communities of faith, and understand it as a reaction to a crisis of a civil society failing to mediate the diverse interests and democratic claims of its constitutency.

Robin Celikates 150 150 Susann Schmeisser

Robin Celikates

Deputy Director, Berlin Center

Freie Universität Berlin, Institute of Philosophy

Email: robin.celikates@fu-berlin.de

Robin Celikates

Since October 2019 Robin Celikates ist deputy director of the Humanities and Social Change Center Berlin.

Prof. Robin Celikates´s research is mainly in political philosophy, critical theory and social philosophy, and focuses particularly on questions of democracy, migration and citizenship, civil disobedience within democratic systems, the moral philosophy of recognition, and methodologies in political philosophy and social philosophy.

Other areas of interest include the philosophy of social sciences, moral philosophy, Rousseau, and political and social theory.