Biography-Venice

Luigi Doria 150 150 Barbara Del Mercato

Luigi Doria

Research Fellow, Venice Center

Project: The Nature of Money and its Social Perception in Times of Crisis – Department of Linguistics and Comparative Cultural Studies, tutor: prof. Francesca Coin)

2018-2021

Email: luigi.doria@unive.it

Luigi Doria

Luigi Doria is a fixed-term researcher at the Department of Linguistics and Comparative Cultural Studies of Ca’ Foscari University of Venice and a fellow of the Center for the Humanities and Social Change at Ca’ Foscari, where he investigates the nature of money and its social perception in times of crisis from the perspective of economic sociology. He graduated in Economics (Economia Politica) from Bocconi University, Milan. He earned his Ph.D. in Regional Planning and Public Policy (Pianificazione Territoriale e Politiche Pubbliche del Territorio) from the University IUAV of Venice. Some of his past activities: he carried out research at the University IUAV of Venice and at Bocconi University, Milan; he was fixed-term researcher of CNRS at the Centre Maurice Halbwachs (CNRS-EHESS-ENS), Paris; he carried out teaching activies (as a docente a contratto) at Bocconi University and at the University of Calabria; he taught a course, as a visiting faculty member, at the International University College of Turin. He was a fellow at the Nantes Institute for Advanced Study.

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Igiaba Scego 150 150 Barbara Del Mercato

Igiaba Scego

Igiaba Scego

Post-Doc Fellow, Venice Center

Project: “Afrodescendants” in Post- World War II Italy: Experiences and Representations (1944-1979) (Dipartimento di Studi Umanistici – Department of Humanities, tutor: prof. Ricciarda Ricorda)

2017-2019

Email: igiabasceg@gmail.com

Igiaba Scego

Igiaba Scego is a writer and a post-Doc researcher of the Center for the Humanities and Social Change at Ca’ Foscari University of Venice. During her first year in Venice she focused on Italian colonialism and blackness in Italy. Scego examined colonialism and masculinity in the light of how culture functions, and what it means. Together with the other Fellows, she is also involved in the Center’s overarching theme of cultural pluralism.
She took part in several events organized by Ca’ Foscari University, such as the literary festival Incroci di Civiltà, where she interviewed the great African writer Ngugi wa Thiong’o. In april 2018 she was actively involved in the Afropean Bridges symposium, the first in a series of international workshops that are going to take place in Venice on Africa-EU relationships and on African-European identity, within the framework of the UN International Decade for People of African Descent.
In her capacity as a writer, in 20017-2018 Scego wrote two short stories based on her research (one of them is about to be published in Italy, the other in Germany), and edited an anthology for children about refugees (Italian publication due in November 2018).

Laura Calvaresi 150 150 Nina Rismal

Laura Calvaresi

Ph.D. Student, Venice Center

Project: Building a language, rethinking an ethic: virtues of the Christian Merchant between liberalitas and industria (1250-1350), (Dipartimento di Studi Umanistici – Department of Humanities, tutor: Antonio Montefusco)

2017-2020

Email: laura.calvaresi@unive.it

Laura Calvaresi

Laura Calvaresi is a Ph.D. candidate in Italian Studies at Ca’ Foscari University of Venice (Departement of Humanities, tutor: Antonio Montefusco) and a Fellow of the Center for the Humanities and Social Change at Ca’ Foscari. Her reaserch project–Building a language, rethinking an ethic: virtues of the Christian Merchant between liberalitas and industria (1250-1350)–is at the crossroads between Italian Literature and Medieval History, dealing with Political Economy in Medieval Literature. Laura’s focus is on the relevant expressions and linguistic syntagmata (compositions) in both Latin and vernacular European languages which represent the merchants’ world of values between 1250 and 1350. Her research also participates in a broader project called Political Economy of Medieval Literature. The formation of economic categories in Medieval European Literature (XII- XV centuries). Her training started at the University of Macerata where she studied Medieval History.

Andrea Drocco 150 150 Nina Rismal

Andrea Drocco

Fixed-term Researcher, Venice Center

Project: Language Rhetoric and Linguistic Strategies of Religious Intolerant Discourses: The Case of South Asia

2017-2020

Email: andrea.drocco@unive.it

ANDREA DROCCO

Andrea Drocco is a Lecturer in the Department of Linguistics at Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, where he is teaching Indo-Aryan linguistics and Hindi. After his Ph.D. in Indological Studies (University of Turin, 2005), he taught Indo-Aryan linguistics at the University of Turin. His main area of research is the development of the alignment system of New Indo-aryan languages, in particular in the period preceding the 19th century. He has published research papers not only on the morphosyntactic alignment of Braj, Hindi and Bangani but languages also on the interpretation of the technical terms tatsamatadbhava and deśī in the context of the medieval Indian grammatical tradition. Andrea is currently a Fellow of the Center for the Humanities and Social Change at Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, and he is carrying out a research on the linguistic and rhetorical strategies of intolerant discourses in South Asia.

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Francesca Massarenti 150 150 Nina Rismal

Francesca Massarenti

Ph.D. Candidate, Venice Center

Project: The Stories that b(l)ind us: How Stories work, and how they Change the World (Dipartimento di Studi Linguistici e Culturali Comparati – Department of Linguistic and Comparative Cultural Studies, tutor: prof. Pia Masiero)

2017-2020

Email: francesca.massarenti@unive.it

FRANCESCA MASSARENTI

Francesca Massarenti is a Ph.D. candidate at Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, where she researches English literature and culture and is a Fellow of the Center for the Humanities and Social Change. Her research intends to examine the cinematic representations of the British literary heritage, in order to tackle how ideas regarding the Nineteenth century appear in the contemporary filmic imagination driven by women directors. Her work looks into the intertextual operations at work between the page and the screen, with a focus on the the narrative techniques and structural devices adopted to translate and convey plots, ideas and tone from a medium to the other.

Marco Marrone 150 150 Nina Rismal

Marco Marrone

Postdoctoral fellow, Venice Center

Project: IT and the future of work: democracy vs. technocracy in the workplace (Dipartimento di Management – Department of Management, tutor: prof. Vladi Finotto)

2017-2019

Email: marco.marrone@unive.it

MARCO MARRONE

Marco Marrone holds a Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of Bologna (2018). His research was on internships and the informalization of labor in Italy. He was a visiting scholar at York University in Toronto, and conducted research in Canada and India. He is currently a post-Doc fellow at the Center for the Humanities and Social Change of Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, where he is working on a project on technology and the transformations of labor. His studies currently focus on the rise of platform capitalism and on workers’ resistance in the food delivery industry. He is also directly involved in workers’ struggles and in the ongoing debate with policy makers to bring on new and positive regulations for the industry. His research interests include the global transformations of capitalism and their impact on both formal and informal work; the transformations of the labour market and its processes (especially those related to technology), the ways precarious workers organize, labour policies and the effects of neoliberalism and austerity policies on the working and living conditions of people. He also collaborates with IRES Emilia-Romagna (Institute for Economic and Social Research) and is on the editorial board of Alternate Route – A Journal of Critical Social Research and on the scientific board of Fondazione Claudio Sabattini. He is the author (with Gianluca De Angelis) of Voucherizzati! Il lavoro al di là del contratto (Socialmente, 2017), and of a variety of articles in both peer review and on-line journals.

Ilenia Pittui 150 150 Nina Rismal

Ilenia Pittui

Ph.D. Candidate, Venice Center

Project: The Iconography of the Turk in the XVth and the XVIth century: a ‘wise knot’ between word and image (Dipartimento di Filosofia e Beni Culturali – Department of Philosophy and Cultural Heritage, tutor: prof. Martina Frank)

2017-2020

Email: ilenia.pittui@unive.it

ILENIA PITTUI

Ilenia is a Ph.D. Student in Art History at Ca’ Foscari University of Venice and a Fellow of the Center for the Humanities and Social Change. After an M.A. in Art History with a thesis in Science and Philology of the Image at the University of Udine, in June 2017 she was awarded as the best student of her M.A.’s course for the a.y. 2015/16. She is currently specialising in Islamic Art and Islamic Culture, with a focus on the iconography of the Turk/Muslim during the Renaissance, seen as an important starting point to discuss and overcome enduring prejudices against the Islamic world and to use art as a tool for deconstructing the fear of the “Other”.

Giovanni Lapis 150 150 Nina Rismal

Giovanni Lapis

Ph.D. Candidate, Venice Center

Project: Education to Interculturality through the Studies of Religions. The Problem of East Asian Religions (Dipartimento di Studi sull’Asia e sull’Africa Mediterranea – Department of Asian and North African Studies, tutor: prof. Massimo Raveri)

2017-2020

Email: giovanni.lapis@unive.it

GIOVANNI LAPIS

Giovanni is a Ph.D. candidate at the Center for the Humanities and Social Change at Ca’ Foscari University of Venice. His research project aims to explore the challenges and potentiality of the study of East Asian Religions applied to the field of Religious Education, with a special emphasis on the dimension of interculturality.

Giovanni has a with a B.A. in Japanese Language and Japanese Culture, and specialized with an M.A. in Sciences of Religions, maintaining a focus on Japan and other east-Asian religions and culture, such as India’s and China’s. His other fields of interest are History of religions, East Asian philosophies, Western philosophy and social sciences.

Since 2010 he has been involved in the scientific divulgation of religions and non-confessional religious education, working in large events such as “Turin Spirituality” Festival and building up a network of like-minded scholars and practitioners between Rome, Turin, Padua, Venice and Trento.

In 2013, he wrote a project proposal on behalf of Ca’ Foscari University of Venice concerning the teaching of religions in public schools, which received full financing from the EU Commission, and was then involved in the project both as Project Manager and as Researcher. In 2017 his proposal for a follow-up project, with a specific focus on stereotypes and prejudices, received funding again  by the EU Commission and is currently (as of 2018) in progress.

His research at the Center for Humanities and Social Change aims at providing a solid theoretical framework and guidance for this kind of operative projects.

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Luigi D’Amelia 150 150 Nina Rismal

Luigi D’Amelia

Research Fellow, Venice Center

Project: Are texts innocent? Nourishing religious prejudice in the Middle Ages (Dipartimento di Studi Umanistici – Department of Humanities, tutor: prof. Antonio Rigo)

2017-2019

Email: luigi.damelia@unive.it

Luigi D'Amelia

Luigi D’Amelia is a post-Doc Fellow at the Centre for Humanities and Social Change hosted by Ca’ Foscari University of Venice (2017-). He works on a project entitled “Are texts innocent? Nourishing religious prejudice in the Middle Ages”, which aims to gather the most standardized and widespread Greek linguistic expressions used by the Byzantines to qualify and denigrate their religious enemies in different literary genres.

He graduated in Classics (MA) at the University of Rome “Tor Vergata” (2009), where in 2013 he completed his PhD in “History of Christianity and of Churches”. In the same year he also obtained a diploma at the Vatican School of Library Studies (2012-2013). In 2015 he was post-Doc Fellow at the Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität in Münster with a Stipendium funded by the Fritz Thyssen Stiftung. In 2015-2018 he was post-Doc Fellow at the University of Venice Ca’ Foscari within a project funded by the Italian Government entitled “I secoli XI e XII prodromi dell’Europa unita e divisa: confronti e scontri tra l’Oriente bizantino e l’Occidente latino” (The 11th and 12th centuries as harbingers of a united and divided Europe: comparisons and confrontations between the Byzantine East and the Latin West).

He is a member of the editorial board of the journal “Nea Rhome”, specialized in Byzantine Studies, and of the Consiglio Direttivo of the Italian Association of Byzantine Studies (AISB).

His main fields of research are: Byzantine Hymnography, Byzantine Hagiography, Greek Palaeography, Medieval Controversies between Greek and Latin Church.

Alan De Piccolo 150 150 Nina Rismal

Alan De Piccolo

Research Fellow, Venice Center

Project: Digital Shakespeare – Shakespeare In and Beyond the Ghetto

(Dipartimento di Studi Linguistici e Culturali Comparati – Department of Linguistic and Comparative Cultural Studies)

2017-2018

Email: alan.delpiccolo@unive.it

Alan De Piccolo

Alan is a post-doc Research Fellow at the Center for the Humanities and Social Change at Ca’ Foscari University of Venice since December 2017. He received the Ph.D. degree in Computer Sciences from the Ca’ Foscari University in 2018. Alan’s core research interest is in the discipline of Human-Computer Interaction, specifically in the use of multisensory feedback to facilitate and enrich the interaction with digital artifacts. His current work pertains the digital dissemination of the Creative Europe project “Shakespeare In and Beyond the Ghetto”, 2016-2018 (http://shabegh.eu/), which dealt with Shakespeare’s play The Merchant of Venice. The goal is to provide scholars and nonprofessionals with the access to the multimedia material generated during the project, and by doing so enable a further investigation of the play’s topics, which are as relevant as ever.